Tag Archives: Diversity

What Color Is Your Flower?

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Unable to Focus

Unable to Focus

The other day, I read something that spoke about neuro scientific research reporting that the average person spends 13 per cent of their time in a frame of mind that is best described as “zoned out.”

At first I felt upset with this information, considering all the wasted time that this indicated my mind wandered. But as I read on, the tone of the article remained upbeat and optimistic. Why? Because these periods where we zone out and don’t have the cognitive awareness we feel we should possess are actually good for us. Yep, it seems they are vital to our being able to stay imaginative and creative. This is the place where our brains free float through what seems like insignificant streams of consciousness.

The reality is that these places of spontaneous thinking are the birth places of creativity and imagination. They are places where our judgmental selves don’t have a chance of surviving so we are free to just let ourselves go. These zone out times permit us to unleash restrictive, rational thought and just allow whatever comes to come.

I have nothing against rational and logical thinking. Far from it. Thinking logically is totally necessary and a good thing. But giving our brains the ability to zone out and just free-flow is equally necessary and provides us with a healthy compliment to routine, structured and rational thoughts.

Harry Chapin

Harry Chapin

One of my favorite songsters of all time is Harry Chapin. I hope most of you have heard of him and remember him, not only for the songs that were the most popular like “Taxi” or “Cats in the Cradle” although they were good songs with a message or story to tell too. But the song that comes to mind is called “Flowers are Red,” a song with a wonderful message about society’s traditional response to thinking differently and seeing things through a lens that is different than the one most of us see through.

There is a degree of comfort in knowing we are all alike and zeroing in on all the similarities we share with our fellow human beings, but there is also something extremely worthwhile when we celebrate our differences and our being unique. There is so much we can learn from these differences. We can complement each other because of these differences if we learn how to embrace them and value them.

This is still something I am learning how to do better. Sometimes my knee-jerk reaction is to expect other people to think the way I think or feel the way I feel and I get upset if they don’t. I want to feel more connected to them and I mistakenly think if they are more like me then we are more connected.

Embrace Diversity

Embrace Diversity

Relationships take a lot of work because of the differences. We need to learn how to accept and respect people despite them. Even if we are similar to another person in our beliefs, the times when we have our zone out moments may not be the same. We may be experiencing something quite crucial to us when our most trusted and closest confidant is going through a zone out moment and is unable to be there to understand.

We may be zoned out when our co-worker asks us for our utmost attention or when our son or daughter is facing potential danger.

Nobody said relationships were easy, and with some of the newer finding about human behavior, we are able to better understand ourselves and each other; and hopefully help us deal with each other with more understanding and kindness.

And what better time to start than right now as this holiday season begins?

The Changing Eye of the Beholder

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Elle Spain

Elle Spain

The fashion world and modeling industry are not my thing, and I rarely focus in on the names of the new faces that are gaining in popularity as they strut their stuff walking down the runways, but something new is on the horizon and I have a feeling it is here to stay, although it is LONG overdue.

Elle Spain’s current cover features a groundbreaking young cover model named Tara Lynn. The thing about her that caught my attention is that Tara Lynn is what is known as a plus-size model. She is currently around the 12-14 size range, but had been more of a 14-16 for most of her life.

Lynn has worked hard to be able to come to terms and accept her body as it is, something that is not shared throughout an industry filled with horror stories about the way women practically starved themselves to the point of causing harm to their overall health in order to look right for the upcoming shoot or to be able to produce the right effect for the clothing they were modeling.
Since she took her first steps forward in the movement of getting the modeling world to see the beauty if voluptuous women, Tara Lynn has fronted H & M’s “Big is Beautiful” campaign and has worked with amazing fashion photographers such as Patrick Demarchelier and Steven Meisel.

The good news is that it seems as if the tide is turning, slowly. Bigger women are becoming more and more accepted in the industry and curvier models are finding their legitimacy with photographers who are excited to do shoots in which they can capture the fuller look, especially since the girls are fit and able to do more with their bodies.

Plus Size Models

Plus Size Models

Admittedly, the differences in bodies with more fat on them makes it difficult to get clothing to look as right as the standard hanger thin model that is standard in the modeling industry. But it is not just clothing. There are cosmetics, shoes, perfumes, jewelry and other modeling gigs that only ultra thin models got in the past. And although it is a slow move in the direction of diversity in body looks and sizes, it is taking place.

Embrace Diversity

Embrace Diversity

The voice this tale carries to the world is that although ultra thin may always be preferred by designers for convenience purposes, beauty is much more permissible to be in the eyes of the beholder, even if the beholder isn’t marching to the beat of the same drummer that we have become accustomed to. No message should be touted out louder to young girls who struggle to accept themselves the way they are. We can work together to set a new standard that says diversity and individuality and uniqueness can be that new standard we all seek.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Judy is a licensed clinical social worker and has worked extensively as a counselor with children, adolescents, couples and families. Judy’s professional experience in the mental health field along with her love of writing, provide insight into real-life experiences and relationships. Her fresh voice and down-to-earth approach to living a happier, more meaningful life are easy to understand and just as easy to start implementing right away for positive results!